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TeamFund Interview

 

TeamFund uses e-commerce to sell items from popular and local food vendors.


  1. Tell us about yourself

    Dominique: My name is Dominique Fraser. I am the Founder and CEO of TeamFund.

    Crystal: I’m Crystal Milne, partner and COO for TeamFund.

    D: TeamFund is an e-commerce platform that helps groups raise funds with food. Our customers are minor sports teams and schools that are needing to raise funds for their cause. When they come to TeamFund, they can create a fundraiser and sell products from local vendors and earn a portion of the sales towards their goal. To date we’ve helped raise over $750,000 in Calgary.

  2. How many people does your team consists of?

    D: We have about four employees right now; three full-time and one part-time, along with more freelancers.

  3. When did you start?

    D: TeamFund was incorporated in 2013, then we launched in 2014. For three years, it was a one-woman operation and two years ago we started to commercialize and took on more people.

  4. What you did prior to this venture

    D: I’m originally from Montreal; I left after high school and spent about eight years traveling, where I lived out my passion for outdoor adventures, snowboarding, surfing, and scuba diving. Years later, I returned to Canada to settle down and have two kids. I supported my husband’s venture while working at Canada Post and then when the time was right, I made the leap to entrepreneurship and launched TeamFund.

    C: When I moved to Calgary, I worked in IT doing business processes, project management, and getting change management processes for a lot of oil and gas clients and CP rail. Then I had children, so I took 10 years off to support my husband and his career while I looked after the kids.

  5. What problem does your business solve?

    D: We make it easy for groups to reach their goal by offering great products that are easy to sell and earn them a competitive commission towards their goal. We handle all the accounting and reporting, leaving no room for error. Additionally,  the logistics ensures that groups can stay organized.

  6. How do you solve this problem?

    D: We make it easy for groups to get started fundraising. We manage all the sales transactions, reporting, and logistics.

  7. When did you notice a gap in the market?

    D: I noticed the gap when I was initially fundraising for my daughter’s soccer team about five or six years ago. I love selling and I could sell to anyone, but walking around with a paper order form in my hand trying to sell to co-workers, friends, and family was difficult and not efficient. I could always get the sale verbally, but collecting money off of them was absolutely painful. We never knew when products were coming in and I didn't have any answers to their questions: “is it gluten free?”, “does it have sugar?”, “what are the nutritionals?”. I thought that I would love to do this online where I could invite people to the web page and they can get all the info they need, understand formats, and know arrival dates so they can determine how much they need to buy.

    C: Even getting that money from funders is actually a huge pain point. For instance, you’ll do a chocolate fundraiser and you won’t actually get the money for a month or two after.  Even though you fundraised, you still have to use your own money until those fundraiser dollars are back; but, we’re able to give it to them within a week of the deliveries.

    D:  We shorten the cycle- that’s one of the biggest value propositions that we show in the cycle. Usually, fundraisers will typically take six to eight weeks, even 10 weeks. Now vendors can see the order volume that’s coming in and plan and prepare. This is an immense change because sometimes they need additional staff as well for these large volume orders. The vendor loves it cause they get paid and they are not chasing anyone for money.

  8. What is your company culture?

    C: The biggest thing is that we support women and we support women that require flexibility. So for me, I have a child who has extra needs, and I am able to do a great job parenting while holding an interesting job. I am also able to take my kids to appointments and it’s just a supportive culture. We work hard and have a lot of wins and a lot of successes, but importantly we also allow for people to continue to have a family life.

    D:  We all work well and we all work remotely. One of the ladies that works with us, she’s in Ontario. There is a two hour time difference between us and her, but we still communicate really well.

  9. What draws people to you?

    D: We have a proven track record and organizations come to us time and time again to repeat their successes. We are trusted by our peers and are industry experts, so we know what it takes to reach a goal.

  10. Three words to describe the company with?

    D: Trusted, proven, and local.

    C: Yeah, I agree. Local means a lot to many of these families. It’s local meat and healthy. We’re giving them something that they would want to buy, at a price point that they would pay regularly. That’s important, especially in this economy.

  11. Why did you choose The Accelerator?

    D: This accelerator allowed us to still run our business and gave us access to some key people that would really help. We are in the middle of a pivot right now, so we still need to run our operations- we’re full on running and busy. For us it was important to have a time balance. Also, it was a bonding experience and gave us access to tools that we never had access to in the past. We’re on a mission and we’re having fun, but we’re also leveraging this to the nook and cranny.

  12. How did you find out about it

    D: It was through the ecosystem. We were invited here when it first got launched and it just seemed to make sense at the time. There’s a lot of noise out there, but this accelerator made sense and it was the right time.

  13. What has your experience with the The Accelerator been like?

    C: It’s been great to learn from experienced mentors and advisors, while allowing us to stay focused on our journey and goal. We are able to learn and add to our skills so that we can be better prepared for the next stage of the company.

    D: We totally love the ecosystem here, it’s very supportive. It’s about giving back as much as it is about seeking help. It’s great to stay connected and learning from other companies as well. We are on a mission, so anything to get us closer is what we were searching for. We were able to find that here.

  14. What has been your biggest lesson you learned while in the program?

    D: To keep pushing forward and keep doing better. Ask yourself why you are doing this and don’t be afraid to have lofty goals.

  15. What has been a major accomplishment for you this year?

    D: Tons! We solidified the partnership which took a while to happen. We raised some money last year through grants.  We also released our technology, which was a barrier for us. We’re super proud of our developer, we did a bang up job.

    C: Our biggest accomplishment really is that we made our foundation so strong that tomorrow we could be in Toronto. We have a national partner now, we can handle the volume, and we can get into any market at any time. It was a big year!

  16. What is next for you?

    D: Before taking over the world? [laughs] We definitely want to be a household name for fundraising and be the go to platform for amateur sports teams and fundraisers. We’re going to be the food fundraising platform; which is a scalable, repeatable and systemized system. So rolling it out nation wide and heading into the US is what we need to do.


 

LevellingUp Interview

 

LevellingUp connects groups of future leaders with leadership coaches.


  1. Tell us about yourself

    My name is Mike de Boer, I am the CEO and Founder of LevellingUp. Over my 20+ years as an oil & gas engineer and executive, I found that strong leadership skills at all levels of an organization are key to having a successful company and a fulfilling workplace.

    LevellingUp comes from realizing a lot of people don’t have access to ways to quickly improve their leadership skills, especially when at the start of their career. The options are either free mentoring from someone - and you often get what you pay for - or very expensive options like executive coaches or an MBA.

    LevellingUp is creating a whole new way to grow leadership skills. We connect growing/future leaders in groups of 5-8 people and pair them with the experienced leader of their choice - an individual we call a Sage.  The Sage may be a certified executive coach or someone who is a proven leader and expert in their field. They will coach, mentor, and teach his or her group on a particular skill specific to the Sage’s experience.

  2. How many people does your team consists of?

    Currently, there is myself and two other co-founders. We also have a part-time admin coordinator. Our Sages are a part of our team as well; currently, we have 18 Sages and more are signing-up every day.

  3. When did you start?

    We've been working on LevellingUp for over a year now, but in November 2018 we started growing the small group concept.  We started with four paying customers in November and now we have dozens of paying customers.

  4. What you did prior to this venture

    I have been in oil & gas in Calgary for my entire career as an engineer, a project manager and executive manager.  I also spent several years as a competitive strongman.

  5. What problem does your business solve?

    There are too many ill-equipped leaders in our workplaces and communities.  With no real alternatives available, most of us just model our leadership style after the leaders already in our lives. Those “poor” leaders wind up creating more “unintentionally poor” leaders and the cycle continues. Everyone wants to do their best, I truly believe that; so let’s equip the next generation of leaders with the coaching and mentorship they need to achieve the excellence they aspire to!

  6. How do you solve this problem?

    Using an online marketplace, we connect small groups of growing leaders with proven experts that help them practice and grow their leadership skills. We use video conferencing so that the group and Sage can be anywhere across the globe.  We spread the Sage’s cost across the group, so the experts that normally charge hundreds of dollars an hour are available for $20-$50 an hour. Also, our community lets us know who the best Sages are by providing feedback via ratings. We make sure those are the Sages equipping the next generation.

  7. When did you notice a gap in the market?

    Throughout my career both as a growing leader and as a leader of leaders, it's been something I’ve noticed for years. I wanted to be a great leader myself, but the other leaders in my workplaces weren’t necessarily the great leaders I aspired to be. I didn’t have enough time available for each person I was guiding, and I didn’t have the expert leadership skills to provide the necessary coaching. It’s basically a sink-or-swim world for most people in the first decade of their career. After 20 years as a solo gym rat - a dedicated but unaccomplished one - I started training with a strongman club. Within months I was winning awards; after 2 years I won Alberta’s strongest man, and after another 2 years I won Western Canada’s strongest man.  I was the same person, but now with feedback from an expert coach and a group of supportive peers. It got me thinking - if feedback from experts and supportive peers could make that kind of difference in sports, imagine the difference it could make in the world of leadership. Imagine if I had access to those experts and peers early on in my career. How different could my life, and the life of those I led, be?

  8. What is your company culture?

    It’s built around the values of growth, community, respect, and giving. We push for continual growth within ourselves and within our company. We respect each other, and we also respect each other enough to confront and challenge each other. As co-founders, we know each other quite well, so it's an open and honest community.

  9. What draws people to you?

    I’m told that it’s my commitment to a bigger purpose, a bigger mission, and my integrity in carrying that out in an authentic fashion. Also, I do what I say I’m going to do.

  10. Three words to describe the company with?

    People Helping People.

  11. Why did you choose The Accelerator?

    One of our biggest needs right now is financial investment, and The Accelerator was directly targeted at helping with that. We felt that the program had the right degree of intensity for us, the right focus, and we heard from others in the program who found it beneficial. Also, one of our advisory board members - Darcy Tuer of ZayZoon - was a graduate of The Accelerator’s Batch 1.

  12. How did you find out about it

    Social Media.

  13. What has your experience with the The Accelerator been like?

    Positive. I’m very impressed by the caliber and the candour of the people that have come in for the different sessions. The Accelerator seems to be well connected to the top people in the startup support community within Calgary. Those people seem to have the right mindset, skills, and attitude towards helping. It's been a very positive experience.

  14. What has been your biggest lesson you learned while in the program?

    Understanding the mindset of investors, how they think, and how to position the business to be highly investable.  I’ve also learned how to get very comfortable delivering my investor pitch!

  15. What has been a major accomplishment for you this year?

    Raising our first financing.

  16. What is next for you?

    Continuing to grow LevellingUp by adding customers and seeing them grow their skills.  We want to add great people to our team, and to ensure that we are living out our mandate to have a positive impact on the world.


 

The Spesh Interview

 

The Spesh brings restaurant specials to an app.

  1. Tell us about yourself

    My name is Jesse and I am the co-founder of The Spesh Corporation. I grew up in Calgary and I’ve always been in the energy business. Over the last few years, obviously, the economic downturn hit and a lot of people lost their jobs and/or had their income cut back. At that time [I noticed from] some friends of mine that ran restaurants that there were a lot of great deals popping up and a lot of opportunities for people to save some money. So we came up with the idea to start an app to showcase all the specials at pubs and restaurants for people that are looking for happy hours, wine deals, beer deals, wing deals, patios, sporting events, live music etc. It would be just an easy few clicks away.  We’re currently over 12,000 downloads of The Spesh, 450,000 clicks and 250 places on the app.

  2. How many people does your team consists of?

    There are just three of us. Two on the tech side and then me on the business development side. We allocate time to The Spesh when we can.

  3. When did you start?

    We started about two and a half years ago, but we went through about 19-20 different versions of the app. Then we got to a test phase period and eventually were able to launch our newest version of The Spesh app last year, which is the best version.

  4. What you did prior to this venture

    I still work in the energy sector; we’ve been able to create & build The Spesh by spending a few hours a week on it and it’s gone pretty well so far.

  5. What problem does your business solve?

    Two things. It provides opportunities for people to go to new places - because in general, people seem to go to the same two or three places - and to help save some money. There are always good deals out there and people are always looking for half priced wine, beer, or wings. It is also good for the restaurants to bring people in during slow times and to attract new people to their places.  The Spesh app also showcases some of the different things that establishments might be doing: speciality beers, vegan nights, showing sporting events, or just weekend and weekday specials. We help get their promotions out, and people seem to really like that. The app is not just about the specials, but trying new places and having fun while you’re doing it.

  6. How do you solve this problem?

    It’s a mobile app on IOS and Android, and within just a few clicks you can find whatever you’re looking for. There’s lots of different categories.

  7. When did you notice a gap in the market?

    Kind of during the downturn in 2015-16, when everything was going downhill in the city. There were lots of layoffs and [previously] restaurants didn’t usually put on a lot of deals, then suddenly they were popping up everywhere. I started noticing it at places I used to go to; so we decided to speak to our friends who ran restaurants about getting these promotions out. We started with 20-30 places and then it grew to 250 places as we have grown our network.

  8. What is your company culture?

    It is just myself and two fellow co-founders, so it’s fun and we have a good time. We do lots of events and stuff in the community with our friends and The Spesh supporters. We like to support different things around town and luckily our energy company supports a lot of charities and community events, so we get out and attend a lot of great things and meet a lot of great people around town. We have a lot of fun and we also go out to eat at places in The Spesh’s network and support them whenever we can as well.

  9. Three words to describe company with?

    We would describe the company as: fun, innovative, and creative. We’ve tried a lot of ideas and marketing things, including a lot of things on social media which has been big for us. We now have close to 10,000 followers on all our social media accounts.

  10. Why did you choose The Accelerator?

    I had some friends that were a part of it; ParkChamp, who were in the batch before us. Also, I met some people at the ATB Booster events that The Spesh helped sponsor, and I met with Thomas and Sam. It’s been great. I’ve met some really great people and it has been great to be involved. Coming from the energy side, I never knew this type of stuff existed in Calgary, and there is kind of an underground tech movement/uprising that not many people know exists here. It has been fun to get exposed to that and be involved in all the events. The ideas just blow my mind- it’s crazy to see what people are actually doing and how creative they are.

  11. How did you find out about it

    Through ParkChamp. I knew them from one of the events we did with ATB at Booster Night. Also, Phil who is part of The Accelerator, met with me last year and we discussed their MyPersonalMenu idea and he mentioned it too. After several people mentioned it, I sent an email to Thomas and it went from there.

  12. What has your experience with the The Accelerator been like?

    It has been fantastic! All the events they have put on have been great. Each event we’re exposed to something different and new people. That pitch event to Vahalla- the creativity, ideas, and seeing people getting help with their presentations was great to watch. There’s just so much value in these things. It’s really good for everyone, and everyone is so nice. It’s just really great people in a creative and fun environment. Sam, Thomas and Pieter are all excellent people and really great to work with. It's amazing to see what they are putting together on the tech side in the city.

  13. What the program has connected you with

    The Valhalla Pitch night was really neat to see. Especially, how it was organized and what questions were asked.  I got to see what people were looking for on certain platforms and hear some direct feedback for participants that needed some guidance. With Pat Lor, everyone got put in their place for everything that they were doing wrong, and you don’t get offended by it, you get better from it.

  14. What has been your biggest lesson you learned while in the program?

    To know how to pitch in a short precise amount of time so that people understand [the business]. You don’t make it too complicated and you don’t ramble on about stuff that your audience doesn’t want to hear. You need to be direct about what your business is and how you can grow it, then let people ask you questions for the finer details if that is what they want. Obviously, as with anything, preparation is extremely important too. If you’re not prepared a pitch just comes off poor and there is no hiding it. For me when I’m talking about The Spesh it’s a lot different than how I would talk about energy. So it was a good wake up for me, cause it caught me off guard and I was terrible at first. It’s fixable though, you have to put some real thought into it, and when you have limited time you have to use all your words properly to make the biggest impact you can in a short period of time. Otherwise you lose people or you sound like you are unsure of your own business model.

  15. What has been a major accomplishment for you this year?

    Getting over 10,000 downloads and getting to 12,000 was pretty big. Obviously, getting over 450,000 clicks on the app is huge as well. We continue to see The Spesh grow and I think we’ve done pretty well for the time we’ve been able to put into The Spesh. We know the concept works and we know that people really like the app.  

  16. What is next for you?

    Raising some money and hiring someone full time to work on our marketing side. Also, starting another strong advertising campaign with our various partners and connections in the city to increase our downloads.  Then going into different cities and really growing our user base and content within The Spesh network. Follow us on our social channels @thespeshyyc to stay up-to-date with Calgary’s best specials!


 
Source: https://www.thespesh.com

Neobi Interview

 

Neobi brings data to Canada’s New Cannabis market.

  1. Tell us about yourself

    My name is Mike Colbourne, I am the founder and CEO of NEOBI Tech. We organize cannabis information and make it accessible to everyone. We just started this accelerator a couple of months ago and it has really helped us develop the business into something more professional. We did pitch night on [March 18th] and it was a great success; it was my first time pitching and I had a lot of fun. The group did really good! We got some great feedback and we took that and make some improvements.

  2. How many people does your team consists of?

    There are 4 of us right now. The CMO, myself the CEO, a CFO and a COO.

  3. When did you start?

    We started building the product last summer, around June of 2018. Then we finished and just released our first product at the end of February. We did our BETA testing and now are in the pilot phase; we just launched on the largest marketplace in the world - which is half a million developers.

  4. What you did prior to this venture

    Prior to this I ran a dispensary, but we couldn’t get the proper licensing to do integrate properly, so it is through this model that I am trying to legitimize.

  5. What problem does your business solve?

    There is a lot of scattered data out there, and in order to do proper research you need to go to a thousand different places. NEOBI generally aggregates all that data into one source and makes it accessible.

  6. How do you solve this problem?

    We solve it through our data set, which is our massive database that consists of thousands of different products and hundreds of different producers across the globe. Then we offer an API to our customers and that is how they consume the data; they write applications, websites, or use it in market research.

  7. When did you notice a gap in the market?

    We noticed it when I first heard that cannabis was going to be legal. We knew that there was going to be a flurry of new companies and brains surfacing. We wanted to organize that data and make it standard for everyone.

  8. What is your company culture?

    Pretty loose. We are a distributed lean team right now. We have two on the east coast and two in Calgary. We haven't really developed a culture yet, but I’d say it is very laid back and nothing corporate.

  9. What draws people to you?

    For customers, we are pretty unique. We don’t have many competitors besides one in the States. There has been a need and people have reached out through LinkedIn and our website to say that there is a really big need for a cannabis API. So we are trying to fill the gap in that sense. On the employee side, we haven't had the pleasure to hire anyone yet, but once we get some funds we’ll be looking to hire some talent and hopefully our culture and the main mission will attract people.

  10. Three words to describe company with?

    Young, Fun, Driven.

  11. Why did you choose The Accelerator?

    Well I shopped around and there were a couple fun opportunities. This one really fits with my schedule and the business itself. There are a lot of great people here and a great culture with great opportunities.

  12. How did you find out about it

    Though word of mouth. I was talking to a couple of other entrepreneurs and they suggested it and told me that [The Accelerator] follows a silicon model.

  13. What has your experience with the The Accelerator been like?

    It has been great! I was super nervous, like I said it was my first time pitching, but getting that out of the way is a big accomplishment. Also, just being here among the community and everybody here are like-minded entrepreneurs which is great!

  14. What the program has connected you with

    So far besides all the knowledge, they put us in touch with two mentors, one from San Francisco and a CTO here in Calgary who is helping us with the SaaS model.

  15. What has been your biggest lesson you learned while in the program?

    Probably the pitching, because I don’t have a lot of public speaking experience. It was a huge help going forward as I’m going to be talking to a lot of investors, so it’s going to be very beneficial.

  16. What has been a major accomplishment for you this year?

    Probably our launch, seeing that it took probably 8 months to build. Just getting it out to the public and making them aware of our product is going to be huge.

  17. What is next for you?

    Next we are trying to raise some money so we can expand our team and hire. Besides that we have some exciting products in the pipe. We are going to do our first product on top of the API which is going to be like the Kayak of cannabis, where you’re going to be able to search 1000’s of websites at once. Something like that doesn’t exist right now so I think it will be popular.


 

Rooco Interview

 

Rooco is changing the way we pay traffic fines.

  1. Tell me about yourself

My name is Andrew Ashton and I am the founder and CEO of Rooco. Rooco is a traffic ticket sharing app that guarantees everybody who pays their ticket with Rooco will save 10% - 15% on the final payment. Currently, the founding team is just myself, but I utilize a network of six lawyers and agents in Calgary, Edmonton and Winnipeg. They act as contract agents that help process the tickets.

2. When did you start?

We launched in Edmonton and Calgary on May 1st, 2018 and on March 1st we did our soft launch in Winnipeg. So far we have about 3,800 tickets that have been paid through Rooco.

So it’s been going really well so far!

3. What problem does your business solve?

Right now, when you receive a ticket, you have two options; you either fight it or pay it. Both those options come with their own set of fees, service charges, hassles and time out of your day. Since Rooco is an online web application, users simply take a photo of the ticket, then upload and answer a few questions. You pay right in the app and we take care of everything from there. This way we save people time and money by making it much easier to manage their ticket payment.

4. How do you solve this problem?

People who are able to find the time to go down to the courthouse to fight their ticket benefit sometimes. But others who can’t take time off work or would need to find a babysitter - they don’t necessarily have that option to go to the courthouse. About 85% of people pay their full tickets just because it’s the easiest thing to do. So we solve this by giving people a chance to pay their ticket and save some money without having to go to the courthouse.

5. When did you notice a gap in the market?

Personal experience wise, I had my own traffic ticket that I showed up to court for and on that day I saw a lot of other people doing the same. There were people with kids, people with disabilities, and people from every walk of life. All had taken huge amounts of time just to pay their ticket. I was there for three hours waiting in line to speak to a prosecutor, only to have some tickets reduced, but others weren’t. At that point, I thought there had to be a better way to help people save money on their tickets, as well as helping people to pay their ticket and move on with their day. That's were a part of the idea of Rooco was founded; if we can save people a bit of money on their ticket and save them from the hassle, then there must be value there. So far we found out that there has been massive value in this venture.

6. What is your company culture?

Right now it’s just me, so it’s a good culture [laughs]. Currently I do everything, but I just brought on a contract marketing consultant to help with some aspects of marketing. As far as processing, handling, sorting and paying all the tickets, and handling the business - I take care of all that.

7. What draws people to you?

I’ve found that so many jobs have people tied to their desk or cars, but as we grow, we’re very interested in exploring the opportunity to find good people and offer them the opportunity to work remotely. It may not work for everyone in every role, but as far as dealing with contractors in other cities it has worked quite well for us.  

8. Describe Rooco in three words.

I’d describe Rooco as the first of its kind, forwards, new and different. We spend a lot of time reassuring people we’re not going to take their money, and assure them we’re not just a scam. It is a lot of getting that messaging out there that we are a new and different company, and it may seem weird to pay less on a traffic ticket, but it is legitimate. We have a good relationship with the court houses, Alberta Justice and Manitoba Justice.

So far we’ve had a lot of really good traction - we’ve done stories with Global News in Edmonton and Calgary. But again, a lot of that messaging is trying to convince people that we’re a company that is working to help people.

9. Why did you choose The Accelerator?

Right now I'm the founding team, so I spend a lot of time trying to solve problems by myself. I was really looking for a network outside of that to bounce problems off of. A lot of us are having similar challenges with similar market place apps where it’s a new concept. So I wanted to get out there and talk it out with other people facing similar challenges. That was one of the biggest features of The Accelerator. Then, obviously, there’s the opportunity to meet people who have gone through this before and have been successful with their business.

10. How did you find out about us?

I found out about The Accelerator through Twitter. I follow a bunch of other entrepreneurship businesses and startups in the Calgary area, and it was just through twitter I learnt about the program.

11. What has your experience with the The Accelerator been like?

The Founders Dinner events have gone really well. Meeting everyone has been awesome. We just finished Base Camp this past weekend with Valhalla Group which was very eye-opening about something you don’t necessarily think about at first. As an entrepreneur you have an idea and you put it out there and go, “ well its seems to be working, but now what?” Through this we’re learning about corporate governance, and learning how to appeal to investors, cause you need to have the structure in place. My experience has been invaluable and so have the people that I've met.  

12. What has been your biggest lesson you learned while in the program?

Learning how important persistence is, especially coming off Base Camp and seeing different ideas. There 's going to be people that like your business and people who hate your business; you have to decide what your business is going to look like and believe in that. There are a lot of challenges as far as different perceptions and different feelings people have. You always have to be open to pivots and different directions your business will go, but you just have to believe in your ability to persevere through challenges.

13. What has been a major accomplishment for you this year?

Well it’s our first year; we’re just coming up on our first fiscal year. Revenue wise we’ll do $500,000 in our first year. That’s a big accomplishment for us to get our MVP out there and see people are using Rooco. Another big win would be the partnerships we have formed with the Investor Group and with the other founders in The Accelerator. We’ve already had a glimpse at where those networks will go; I’ve already seen benefits for myself and for other members of the cohort. That has been a huge win.

14. What is next for you?

One of the initial things I didn't realize is that we have a huge corporate advantage, especially with rental car companies. They have reached out to us looking to save money on their traffic tickets. Initially, we were a consumer option, but it appears to be affecting businesses and the corporate side. Especially since many businesses are spending 30 hours a week processing, handling, and paying for radar tickets that are registered to the company. Employees are having to track and pay, which is a huge pain point for them. So that is an opportunity for us to expand what services we can offer. This is where that pivot comes in, even though we started with the B2C, that may not be where we finish.